Bottle Battles

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This Sunday I’m thankful there are men in the world who don’t allow even the mortal danger of organized violence to come between them and a good piss-up.

A few months ago, in the March 2020 issue of Miniature Wargames magazine, I learned about the Battle of Tuttlingen.

Tuttlingen

I thought, “Cool, that’s a well written Thirty Years War scenario; and one side being loaded does make it VS.” Then, as is my wont, I carried on.

Fast Forward to last week. My awesome Mailman delivered my copy of the Medieval Warfare 2019 Special Edition: Rise of the Gun (which is excellent, by the way!). Therein is an article titled, “The Good, the Bad and the Intoxicated.” That’s when I found out about the Battle of Beverhoutsveld.

Beverhoutsveld

The moral of the story is this: if your enemy’s tight as an owl you’ll likely carry the day.

[Addenda: DRUNKTIONARY!

Also this.]

 

OK Now this Plague is Really Getting in the Way

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Lamentations of the Flame Princess (US Store) just released a handful of new titles.

For virus-related reasons he’s unable to ship to a few countries, including Canada.

If you’re up here and want any of the new books I recommend you go through a freight forwarder.

Going through a forwarder will add shipping costs to your order for sure, but if you want the books sooner than later and are willing to foot the bill it’s a solid option.

I’ve been a customer of Can-Amer Freight in Blaine, Washington for years. They’re good people; I’ve never had anything but great service. Their receiving fee is nominal and they get me the lowest price available on postage to slingshot my stuff up here.

There are probably forwarders all along the border. Check for your province.

Find one, contact them to learn their procedures, then place your order with Lamentations. Boccob’s yer uncle!

Thankful for the Middle Ages

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What a time to be alive!

Something I’ve wondered about off and on for years is why nobody was making figs inspired by classic art. There are a lot — tons really — of minis out there of this or that TV or film character. And a fair few of daring heroes and cruel villains from books and comics. But nobody was mining manuscripts or pillaging paintings for ideas. Until finally …

Antediluvian Miniatures has a terrific range of demons pulled from the pages of manuscripts and woodcuts.

Skull & Crown’s Triumph of Death is a marvellous line of skeletons taken from medieval and renaissance books and prints.

Skull & Crown’s Killer Rabbits are a wonderful warren of malevolent bunnies modelled after medieval marginalia. Seriously, it was a weird scene. Check it out.

And last but sooo not least, Old School Miniatures has a great range of rabbits and other marginalia minis. I mean …

Right!?

So yes, I’m thankful for these magnificent Medieval minions.

[Edit: I should mention Hereditary and Paimon. Do it!]

Thirlwall Castle

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This will probably be the last of my posts about the North of England.

We went to Thirlwall Castle. It was a cool cloudy day. Seemed right.

Here are the three plaques nearby and on site.

And I shot a pano of each face. I hope they’re useful to some of you.

From the Northwest

From the Southwest

From the Northeast

From the Southeast

As I said earlier, I’ve recently been delving into Burrows & Badgers. And now I find myself on the brink of going down the Rampant hole.

So castles are on my mind.

King Arthur’s Well

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One morning in Haltwhistle I was poring over this map …

… (which I pre-ordered before we left home, still have and still love) and came across this:

So we worked it into our hike that day.

Here’s the approach from the west:

And here are two shots of it looking north:

And here is a pic of the open space to its immediate northeast:

Much later I looked it up online and drilled down on it in Maps. Here’s what I found:

Strangely, I was only able to find a couple websites that mention it, and only THIS ONE loaded.

Equally strange nobody seems to have taken photos of it like the ones I shot, so you’re welcome to them.

Now, given that one can’t turn around in Britain without tripping over something really, really old, it’s possible I was at some other site entirely.

Oh, and I’ll add that sheep seem serene — if a bit skittish — in ones and twos at a farm or fair. But when there’s fifty or so of them standing perfectly still, staring unblinking as you walk by. Well, it’s disconcerting.